Improving health care education through simulation

A GW Nursing student speaks with high school students during an event with partner organization Envision.
A GW Nursing student speaks with high school students during an event with partner organization Envision.
June 23, 2017

As part of their commitment to strengthening partnerships and creating new collaborations to improve health care education and delivery, GW Nursing faculty and students this week shared their health care simulation expertise with learners on both ends of the education spectrum. Both high school students and experienced nurse educators visited GW Nursing’s Virginia Science & Technology Campus for simulation-centered immersive experiences.

As a host school for the International Nursing Association for Clinical Simulation and Learning (INACSL) 2017 Conference June 21-24 in Washington, D.C., GW Nursing offered an INACSL pre-conference event June 21. Dean Pamela Jeffries, the author of the groundbreaking NLN/Jeffries Simulation Theory, served as keynote speaker.

“I’m such an advocate of simulations because we immerse the learner in their scope of practice,” said Dean Jeffries. “As the health care landscape moves from acute care to primary care, it’s important that simulations also reflect community-based health care delivery,” the Dean said. The day’s immersion activities reflected those types of scenarios.

Nurse educators from around the globe, including Canada, Iran, South Korea and Turkey visited the Ashburn, VA campus to hear Dean Jeffries and participate in four immersion activities with staff and faculty from the GW Nursing Simulation Learning and Innovation Center.

Earlier in the week, students considering careers in health care were introduced to the basics at GW Nursing’s simulation center. More than 150 students from Envision, a leadership program for high-achieving high school students, participated in interactive sessions led by Dr. Patty Davis and nursing students.

GW Nursing students taught modules on Accident and Injury Prevention and Care, Health Promotion, Impact of Opioids, Infection Control, Respiratory Assessment, and Stress and Time Management. Using black lights to literally highlight the importance of thorough hand washing and simulation manikins to teach the basics of listening to a heartbeat, GW Nursing students offered the Envision participants a preview of health care education.

This was the second year GW Nursing partnered with Envision.